May Flowers

May Flowers: 20 Spring Blossoms to Forage and Preserve, on Punk Domestics

Bye bye, April showers. You know what that means. Spring is in full bloom, and edible flowers are bursting out all over. We've got a great big bouquet of blossoms for you to forage and incorporate in DIY projects.

Violets
Violets
Take a stroll through your local field, and capture dainty violets' delicate flavor and lurid color in syrup and jelly. (Image via Use Real butter)
Elderflower
Elderflower
Sweetly aromatic heads of elderflowers are cropping up all over. Capture their springlike essence while you can with these DIY elderflower projects. (Image via Well Hung Food)

Roses
More than just pretty, rosa rugosa perfumes jellies, syrups, wines and much more. And when the flowers have faded, the rose hips are even more useful. (Image via Eating Niagara)
Lavender
Lavender
One of the most culinarily useful flowers, lavender adds an almost musky perfume to everything it touches. A little goes a long way! (Image via Larder Love)
Dandelions
Dandelions
No mere weeds, these. Dandelions make for a sunny yellow wine, a fragrant jelly, or just a colorful addition to salads. (Image via The Old School)
Lilacs
Lilacs
Intoxicatingly fragrant lilacs and their cheery purple-pink hue are surprisingly delicious. Try and see! (Image via Kitchen Vignettes)
Nasturtium
Nasturtium
Pretty yellow-orange nasturtium blossoms pack a peppery flavor, the greens can be made into pesto, and when the pods come in, they can be pickled for an alternative to capers. (Image via Washington's Green Grocer)
Chive Blossoms
Chive Blossoms
Infused into vinegar, chive blossoms lend a sweetness as well as a zesty, oniony kick. (Image via Delectable Musings)
Forsythia
Forsythia
Daringly yellow forsythia blossoms are edible, and make for a glowingly yellow syrup. But hurry -- their season is fleeting! (Image via Local Kitchen)
Yucca Blossoms
Yucca Blossoms
We say yum-a to yucca. The blossoms have a vegetal flavor, slightly reminiscent of artichokes (also a flower, incidentally). Fry them up, or marinate them and pack them in oil. (Image via Hank Shaw)
Black Locust Flowers
Black Locust Flowers
While most parts of the tree are toxic, the fragrant flowers are edible. Delicious right off the tree, they can also be used in jelly, syrup or even donuts. (Image via The 3 Foragers)
Geranium
Geranium
One of the most common garden flowers (or even window boxes, for that matter) is delicious in salads. The aromatic leaves and blossoms of the rose geranium can be used in a unique liqueur as well. (Image via Israeli Kitchen)
Maple Blossoms
Maple Blossoms
Dainty maple blossoms are delicious fried up in fritters, or simply rolled up in a fresh spring roll. (Image via Salt Fat Whiskey)
Daylilies
Daylilies
The shoots and tubers of the daylily are perfect right now, and as the blossoms come into bud, they can be consumed as well. (Image via The 3 Foragers)
Chamomile
Chamomile
This common ground cover's blossoms have a grassy, honeyed aroma, making it excellent infused in honey, made into a liqueur, or dried for tea. (Image via A Little Bit of Spain in Iowa)
Poppies
Poppies
Start collecting poppy petals to make an unusual liqueur that can be drank as a sweet dreams nightcap. If it's not to your taste you can use it as a cough medicine! (Image via Wildcraft Diva)
Peonies
Peonies
Peony jelly needs nothing more than to be spread lightly on an airy slice of bread to evoke a perfect day in May, when a ray of sun is piercing through a cooling gray rain cloud. (Image via Imperfect Urban Farm)
Hollyhocks
Hollyhocks
A member of the marshmallow family, the buds can be made into capers, and the root can be made into tea and, yes, marshmallow. (Image via Rubus Raspberry)
Queen Anne's Lace
Queen Anne's Lace
A favorite of Victorian times, Queen Anne's Lace jelly is tart and floral. Be careful when foraging, though, that you are not picking toxic water hemlock. (Image via Pixies Pocket)
Glacier Lily
Glacier Lily
Glacier Lilies come out right after the snow melts in Montana. The leaves are edible raw or cooked, the green seed pods can also be cooked and the flowers make a delicious, raspberry colored jelly. (Image via Born in the Wrong Century)

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